Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549


FORM 10-Q


 

(Mark One) 

 

    QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2017

 

OR

 

    TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission file number: 001-37813


SYROS PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)


 

 

 

 

Delaware

  

45-3772460

(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

 

620 Memorial Drive, Suite 300

Cambridge, Massachusetts

 

02139

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

 

(617) 744-1340

(Registrant’s Telephone Number, Including Area Code)

 

(Former Name, Former Address and Former Fiscal Year, if Changed Since Last Report)

 


 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  ☒    No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  ☒     No  ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

 

 

 

Large accelerated filer  

    

Accelerated filer  

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer  

 

Smaller reporting company  

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

Emerging growth company   

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.   

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  ☐     No  ☒

 

Number of shares of the registrant’s common stock, $0.001 par value, outstanding on May 9, 2017: 26,180,116

 

 

 

 


 

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

Page

Part I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION 

 

 

Item 1.    Financial Statements (unaudited) 

3

 

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 

3

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 

4

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Loss for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 

5

Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 

6

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements 

7

 

 

Item 2.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 

20

 

 

Item 3.    Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 

28

 

 

Item 4.    Controls and Procedures 

28

 

 

Part II – OTHER INFORMATION 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors 

29

 

 

Item 2.    Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 

72

 

 

Item 6.    Exhibits 

72

 

 

Signatures 

73

 

 

 

2


 

Table of Contents

PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements (unaudited)

 

SYROS PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

March 31, 

    

December 31, 

 

 

 

2017

 

2016

 

Assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

47,999

 

$

58,588

 

Marketable securities

 

 

22,495

 

 

25,005

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

551

 

 

867

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

1,460

 

 

1,048

 

Total current assets

 

 

72,505

 

 

85,508

 

Property and equipment, net

 

 

4,546

 

 

4,850

 

Other long-term assets

 

 

489

 

 

482

 

Restricted cash

 

 

483

 

 

483

 

Total assets

 

$

78,023

 

$

91,323

 

Liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

2,377

 

$

2,415

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

3,989

 

 

6,115

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

 —

 

 

550

 

Deferred rent, current portion

 

 

328

 

 

319

 

Capital lease obligations, current portion

 

 

171

 

 

168

 

Total current liabilities

 

 

6,865

 

 

9,567

 

Deferred rent, net of current portion

 

 

1,013

 

 

1,101

 

Capital lease obligations, net of current portion

 

 

 9

 

 

53

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commitments and contingencies (Note 8)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders' equity:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferred stock, $0.001 par value; 10,000,000 shares authorized at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively, 0 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value; 200,000,000 shares authorized at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively; 23,432,728 and 23,380,888 shares issued and outstanding at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, respectively

 

 

23

 

 

23

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

 

182,897

 

 

181,844

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

 

(13)

 

 

(9)

 

Accumulated deficit

 

 

(112,771)

 

 

(101,256)

 

Total stockholders' equity

 

 

70,136

 

 

80,602

 

Total liabilities and stockholders' equity

 

$

78,023

 

$

91,323

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

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SYROS PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31, 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

    

Revenue

 

$

1,101

 

$

 —

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

9,628

 

 

8,265

 

General and administrative

 

 

3,086

 

 

2,371

 

Total operating expenses

 

 

12,714

 

 

10,636

 

Loss from operations

 

 

(11,613)

 

 

(10,636)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other income, net

 

 

98

 

 

48

 

Net loss

 

$

(11,515)

 

$

(10,588)

 

Accrued dividends on preferred stock

 

 

 —

 

 

(1,737)

 

Net loss applicable to common stockholders

 

$

(11,515)

 

$

(12,325)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss per share applicable to common stockholders - basic and diluted

 

$

(0.49)

 

$

(5.15)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-average number of common shares used in net loss per share applicable to common stockholders - basic and diluted

 

 

23,393,448

 

 

2,394,470

 

 

 

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

 

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SYROS PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE LOSS

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31, 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

 

Net loss

 

$

(11,515)

 

$

(10,588)

 

Other comprehensive loss:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized holding losses on marketable securities

 

 

(4)

 

 

 —

 

Comprehensive loss

 

$

(11,519)

 

$

(10,588)

 

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

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SYROS PHARMACEUTICALS, INC.

CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(in thousands)

(unaudited)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

 

 

March 31, 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

  

Operating activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(11,515)

 

$

(10,588)

 

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

 

365

 

 

304

 

Stock-based compensation expense

 

 

884

 

 

662

 

Net amortization of premiums and discounts on marketable securities

 

 

 7

 

 

 —

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

 

(412)

 

 

(552)

 

Accounts receivable

 

 

316

 

 

 —

 

Other long-term assets

 

 

18

 

 

 —

 

Accounts payable

 

 

220

 

 

(914)

 

Accrued expenses

 

 

(2,074)

 

 

540

 

Deferred revenue

 

 

(550)

 

 

 —

 

Deferred rent and lease incentive

 

 

(79)

 

 

(70)

 

Net cash used in operating activities

 

 

(12,820)

 

 

(10,618)

 

Investing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purchases of property and equipment

 

 

(396)

 

 

(1,525)

 

Maturities of marketable securities

 

 

2,499

 

 

 —

 

Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities

 

 

2,103

 

 

(1,525)

 

Financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Payments on capital lease obligations

 

 

(41)

 

 

(17)

 

Proceeds from issuance of common stock

 

 

169

 

 

 —

 

Proceeds from issuance of convertible preferred stock, net of issuance costs

 

 

 —

 

 

39,811

 

Payments of offering costs

 

 

 —

 

 

(1,427)

 

Net cash provided by financing activities

 

 

128

 

 

38,367

 

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

 

 

(10,589)

 

 

26,224

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning of period

 

 

58,588

 

 

35,909

 

End of period

 

$

47,999

 

$

62,133

 

Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash paid for interest

 

$

 3

 

$

 5

 

Non-cash investing and financing activities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment received but unpaid as of period end

 

$

14

 

$

196

 

Offering costs incurred but unpaid as of period end

 

$

25

 

$

235

 

 

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

 

 

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Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

(unaudited)

1. Nature of Business

 

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (the "Company"), a Delaware corporation formed in November 2011, is a biopharmaceutical company seeking an understanding of the non-coding region of the genome to advance new medicines to control the expression of disease-driving genes. The Company has built a proprietary platform designed to analyze this unexploited region of DNA in human disease tissue to identify and drug novel targets linked to genomically defined patient populations.

 

The Company is subject to a number of risks similar to those of other early stage companies, including dependence on key individuals; risks inherent in the development and commercialization of medicines to treat human disease; competition from other companies, many of which are larger and better capitalized; risks relating to obtaining and maintaining necessary intellectual property protection; and the need to obtain adequate additional financing to fund the development of its product candidates and discovery activities. If the Company is unable to raise capital when needed or on favorable terms, it would be forced to delay, reduce, eliminate or out-license certain of its research and development programs or future commercialization rights to its drug candidates.

 

On July 6, 2016, the Company completed an initial public offering, in which the Company issued and sold 4,600,000 shares of its common stock at a public offering price of $12.50 per share, including 600,000 shares of common stock sold pursuant to the underwriters’ exercise of their option to purchase additional shares of common stock, for aggregate gross proceeds of $57.5 million  (the “IPO”). The Company received approximately $49.9 million in net proceeds after deducting $7.6 million of underwriting discounts and commissions and offering costs. Upon the closing of the IPO, all of the outstanding shares of the Company’s convertible preferred stock automatically converted into 15,988,800 shares of common stock at the applicable conversion ratio then in effect. Subsequent to the closing of the IPO, there were no shares of preferred stock outstanding. In connection with the IPO, the Company amended and restated its Fourth Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation to change the authorized capital stock to 200,000,000 shares designated as common stock, and 10,000,000 shares designated as preferred stock, all with a par value of $0.001 per share. The significant increase in common stock outstanding in July 2016 relating to the IPO and conversion of convertible preferred stock is expected to impact the year-over-year comparability of the Company’s net loss per share calculations over the next year.

 

The Company has incurred significant annual net operating losses in every year since its inception. It expects to continue to incur significant and increasing net operating losses for at least the next several years. The Company’s net losses were $47.7 million, $29.8 million and $13.4 million for the years ended December 31, 2016,  2015 and 2014, respectively, and $11.5 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017. As of March 31, 2017, the Company had an accumulated deficit of $112.8 million. The Company has not generated any revenues from product sales, has not completed the development of any product candidate and may never have a product candidate approved for commercialization. The Company has financed its operations to date primarily through private placements of its preferred stock, the sale of common stock in the IPO, and a private financing in April 2017. The Company has devoted substantially all of its financial resources and efforts to research and development and general and administrative expense to support such research and development. The Company’s net losses may fluctuate significantly from quarter to quarter and year to year. Net losses and negative cash flows have had, and will continue to have, an adverse effect on the Company’s stockholders' (deficit) equity and working capital. The Company believes that its cash, cash equivalents and marketable securities of $70.5 million as of March 31, 2017, combined with the net proceeds from the private placement of common stock that the Company completed in April 2017, will be sufficient to allow the Company to fund its current operating plan for a period of at least 12 months past the issuance date of these unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements. 

 

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The Company’s unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”). Any reference in these notes to

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Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

applicable guidance is meant to refer to the authoritative United States generally accepted accounting principles as found in the Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) and Accounting Standards Updates (“ASU”) of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”). Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP have been condensed or omitted from this report, as is permitted by such rules and regulations. Accordingly, these financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2016 and notes thereto included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) on March 20, 2017. 

 

The unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared on the same basis as the audited financial statements. In the opinion of the Company’s management, the accompanying unaudited interim condensed consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments that are necessary to present fairly the Company’s financial position as of March 31, 2017, the results of its operations for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 and cash flows for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016. Such adjustments are of a normal and recurring nature. The results for the three months ended March 31, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results for the year ending December 31, 2017, or for any future period.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying condensed consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiary, Syros Securities Corporation, which is a Massachusetts corporation formed by the Company in December 2014 to exclusively engage in buying, selling and holding securities on its own behalf. All intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Management considers many factors in selecting appropriate financial accounting policies and in developing the estimates and assumptions that are used in the preparation of the financial statements. Management must apply significant judgment in this process. In addition, other factors may affect estimates, which include, but are not limited to, expected business and operational changes, sensitivity and volatility associated with the assumptions used in developing estimates and whether historical trends are expected to be representative of future trends. Management’s estimation process often may yield a range of potentially reasonable estimates and management must select an amount that falls within that range of reasonable estimates. On an ongoing basis, the Company’s management evaluates its estimates, which include, but are not limited to, estimates related to revenue recognition, stock-based compensation expense, including estimating the fair value of the Company’s common stock, accrued expenses and income taxes. Actual results may differ from those estimates or assumptions.

 

Segment Information

 

        Operating segments are identified as components of an enterprise about which separate discrete financial information is available for evaluation by the chief operating decision maker, or decision making group, in making decisions on how to allocate resources and assess performance. The Company's chief operating decision maker is the Chief Executive Officer. The Company and the chief operating decision maker view the Company's operations and manage its business in one operating segment. The Company operates only in the United States.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid instruments that have original maturities of three months or less when acquired to be cash equivalents. Cash equivalents, which consist of money market funds, overnight repurchase agreements and government agency obligations, are stated at fair value. The Company maintains its bank accounts at one major financial institution.

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Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

ASC Topic 820, Fair Value Measurement (“ASC 820”), establishes a fair value hierarchy for instruments measured at fair value that distinguished between assumptions based on market data (observable inputs) and the Company’s own assumptions (unobservable inputs). Observable inputs are inputs that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on market data obtained from sources independent of the Company. Unobservable inputs are inputs that reflect the Company’s assumption about the inputs that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability, and are developed based on the best information available in the circumstances.

 

ASC 820 identified fair value as the exchange price, or exit price, representing the amount that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants. As a basis for considering market participant assumptions in fair value measurements, ASC 820 established a three-tier fair value hierarchy that distinguishes between the following:

 

Level 1—Quoted market prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2—Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are either directly or indirectly observable, such as quoted market prices, interest rates and yield curves.

 

Level 3—Unobservable inputs developed using estimates or assumptions developed by the Company, which reflect those that a market participant would use.

 

To the extent that the valuation is based on models or inputs that are less observable or unobservable in the market, the determination of fair value requires more judgment. Accordingly, the degree of judgment exercised by the Company in determining fair value is greatest for instruments categorized as Level 3. A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

 

The carrying amounts reflected in the balance sheets for cash and cash equivalents, marketable securities, prepaid expenses, other current assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximate their fair values, due to their short-term nature.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

To date, the Company’s only source of revenue has been a research agreement with a multinational pharmaceutical company. For the three months ended March 31 2017, the Company recognized $1.1 million in revenue related to this agreement. No revenue was recognized under this research agreement during the three months ended March 31, 2016. This research agreement expired on March 31, 2017 in accordance with its terms.

 

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with ASC Topic 605, Revenue Recognition (“ASC 605”). Accordingly, revenue is recognized when all of the following criteria are met:

 

·

persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists;

 

·

delivery has occurred or services have been rendered;

 

·

the seller’s price to the buyer is fixed or determinable; and

 

·

collectability is reasonably assured.

 

Amounts received prior to satisfying the revenue recognition criteria are recognized as deferred revenue in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets. Amounts expected to be recognized as revenue within the 12 months following

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Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

the balance sheet date are classified in current liabilities. Amounts not expected to be recognized as revenue within the 12 months following the balance sheet date are classified as deferred revenue, net of current portion.

 

The Company analyzes arrangements with multiple deliverables based on the guidance in ASC Topic 605-25, Revenue Recognition—Multiple Element Arrangements (“ASC 605-25”). Pursuant to the guidance in ASC 605-25, the Company evaluates multiple element arrangements to determine (1) the deliverables included in the arrangement and (2) whether the individual deliverables represent separate units of accounting or whether they must be accounted for as a combined unit of accounting. This evaluation involves subjective determinations and requires management to make judgements about the individual deliverables and whether such deliverables are separate from other aspects of the contractual relationship. Deliverables are considered separate units of accounting provided that: (i) the delivered item(s) has value to the customer on a standalone basis and (ii) if the arrangement includes a general right of return relative to the delivered item(s), delivery or performance of the undelivered item(s) is considered probable and substantially within control of the Company. The Company’s research agreement contains a single unit of accounting.

 

The Company recognizes arrangement consideration allocated to each unit of accounting when all of the revenue recognition criteria in ASC 605 are satisfied for that particular unit of accounting. In the event that a deliverable does not represent a separate unit of accounting, the Company would recognize revenue from the combined unit of accounting over the contractual or estimated performance period for the undelivered items, which is typically the term of its research and development obligations. If there is no discernible pattern of performance or objectively measurable performance measures do not exist, then the Company would recognize revenue under the arrangement on a straight-line basis over the period it expects to complete its performance obligations or upon completion when the final act is of such significance to the overall arrangement that performance has not substantively occurred until the completion of that act. Conversely, if the pattern of performance over which the service is provided to the customer can be determined and objectively measurable performance measures exist, then the Company would recognize revenue under the arrangement using the proportional performance method.

 

The Company recognizes revenue under its research agreement based upon the completed performance method of revenue recognition as it is unable to reasonably estimate the period of performance of the services and the delivery of the final study report is significant to the arrangement.

 

Research and Development

 

Expenditures relating to research and development are expensed in the period incurred. Research and development expenses consist of both internal and external costs associated with the development of the Company’s gene control platform and product candidates. Research and development costs include salaries and benefits, materials and supplies, external research, preclinical and clinical development expenses, stock-based compensation expense and facilities costs. Facilities costs primarily include the allocation of rent, utilities and depreciation.

 

In certain circumstances, the Company is required to make nonrefundable advance payments to vendors for goods or services that will be received in the future for use in research and development activities. In such circumstances, the nonrefundable advance payments are deferred and capitalized, even when there is no alternative future use for the research and development, until related goods or services are provided.

 

The Company records accruals for estimated ongoing research costs. When evaluating the adequacy of the accrued liabilities, the Company analyzes progress of the work being performed, including the phase or completion of the event, invoices received and costs. Significant judgements and estimates may be made in determining the accrued balances at the end of any reporting period. Actual results could differ from the Company’s estimates.

 

The Company may in-license the rights to develop and commercialize product candidates. For each in-license transaction the Company evaluates whether it has acquired processes or activities along with inputs that would be sufficient to constitute a “business” as defined under U.S. GAAP. A “business” as defined under U.S. GAAP consists of inputs and processes applied to those inputs that have the ability to create outputs. Although businesses usually have outputs, outputs are not required for an integrated set of activities to qualify as a business. When the Company

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Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

determines that it has not acquired sufficient processes or activities to constitute a business, any up-front payments, as well as milestone payments, are immediately expensed as research and development in the period in which they are achieved.

 

Stock-Based Compensation Expense

 

The Company accounts for its stock-based compensation awards in accordance with ASC Topic 718, Compensation—Stock Compensation (“ASC 718”). ASC 718 requires all stock-based payments to employees and directors, including grants of restricted stock and stock options, to be recognized as expense in the consolidated statements of operations based on their grant date fair values. Grants of restricted stock and stock options to other service providers, referred to as non-employees, are required to be recognized as expense in the consolidated statements of operations based on their vesting date fair values. The Company estimates the fair value of options granted using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Prior to June 30, 2016, the Company was a private company and lacks Company-specific historical and implied volatility information. Therefore, it estimates its expected stock volatility based on the historical volatility of a publicly traded set of peer companies and expects to continue to do so until such time as it has adequate historical data regarding the volatility of its own traded stock price. The expected term of the Company’s stock options has been determined utilizing the “simplified” method for awards that qualify as “plain-vanilla” options. The expected term of stock options granted to non-employees is equal to the contractual term of the option award. The risk-free interest rate is determined by reference to the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant of the award for time periods approximately equal to the expected term of the award. Expected dividend yield is based on the fact that the Company has never paid cash dividends and does not expect to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. The Company uses the value of its common stock to determine the fair value of restricted stock awards.

 

The amount of stock-based compensation expense recognized during a period is based on the fair value of the portion of the awards that are ultimately expected to vest. As a result of the adoption of ASU 2016-09, effective January 1, 2017, the Company accounts for forfeitures as they occur instead of estimating forfeitures at the time of grant and revising those estimates in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from its estimates. Ultimately, the actual expense recognized over the vesting period will be for only those options that vest.

 

The Company expenses the fair value of its stock-based awards to employees on a straight-line basis over the associated service period, which is generally the vesting period. For stock-based awards granted to non-employees, stock-based compensation expense is recognized over the period during which services are rendered by such non-employees until completed. At the end of each financial reporting period prior to completion of the service, the fair value of these awards is remeasured using the then-current fair value of such awards.

 

For stock-based awards that contain performance-based milestones, the Company records stock-based compensation expense in accordance with the accelerated attribution model. Management evaluates when the achievement of a performance-based milestone is probable based on the expected satisfaction of the performance conditions as of the reporting date. For certain of the Company’s performance-based awards, notwithstanding any vesting in accordance with the achievement of performance-based milestones, such awards vest in full on the sixth anniversary of the vesting commencement date.

 

Net Loss per Share

 

Basic net loss per share applicable to common stockholders is calculated by dividing net loss applicable to common stockholders by the weighted average shares outstanding during the period, without consideration for common stock equivalents. Diluted net loss per share applicable to common stockholders is calculated by adjusting the weighted average shares outstanding for the dilutive effect of common stock equivalents outstanding for the period, determined using the treasury-stock method and the if-converted method. For purposes of the dilutive net loss per share applicable to common stockholders calculation, convertible preferred stock, stock options, and unvested restricted stock are considered to be common stock equivalents but are excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share applicable to common stockholders, as their effect would be anti-dilutive; therefore, basic and diluted net loss per share applicable to common stockholders were the same for all periods presented as a result of the Company’s net loss.

11


 

Table of Contents

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

 

The following common stock equivalents were excluded from the calculation of diluted net loss per share applicable to common stockholders for the periods indicated because including them would have had an anti-dilutive effect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As of March 31, 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

    

Convertible preferred stock

 

 —

 

15,988,800

 

Stock options

 

3,158,558

 

2,217,953

 

Unvested restricted stock

 

3,553

 

142,215

 

 

 

3,162,111

 

18,348,968

 

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue From Contracts With Customers (“ASU 2014-09”). ASU 2014-09 amends ASC 605, Revenue Recognition, by outlining a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers. ASU 2014-09 will be effective for the Company for interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017. Entities have the option of using either a full retrospective or a modified retrospective approach to adopt this new guidance. The FASB issued supplemental adoption guidance and clarification to ASU 2014-09 in March 2016, April 2016, May 2016, and December 2016 within ASU 2016-08 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Principal vs. Agent Considerations,” ASU 2016-10 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing,” ASU 2016-12 “Revenue from Contracts with Customers: Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients,” and ASU 2016-20 “Technical Corrections and Improvements to Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers,” respectively. The Company currently has one revenue arrangement, which it expects will be completed prior to adoption. The Company plans to use the modified retrospective approach in adopting this standard.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (“ASU 2016-02”), which applies to all leases and will require lessees to put most leases on the balance sheet, but recognize expense in a manner similar to the current standard. ASU 2016-02 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018 and interim periods within those years, and, as such, will be effective for the year ended December 31, 2019 for the Company. Entities are required to use a modified retrospective approach of adoption for leases that exist or are entered into after the beginning of the earliest comparative period in the financial statements. Full retrospective application is prohibited. The Company is evaluating the new guidance and the expected effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. However, the Company anticipates recognition of additional assets and corresponding liabilities related to its operating lease.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230) (ASU No. 2016-15), which simplifies certain elements of cash flow classification. The new guidance is intended to reduce diversity of practice in how certain transactions are classified in the statement of cash flows. ASU No. 2016-15 is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of ASU No. 2016-15 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In November 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-18, Restricted Cash (ASU No. 2016-18). The amendments in ASU No. 2016-18 require an entity to reconcile and explain the period-over-period change in total cash, cash equivalents and restricted cash within its statements of cash flows. ASU No. 2016-18 is effective for fiscal years (including interim reporting periods within those years) beginning after December 15, 2017. Early adoption is permitted. A reporting entity must apply the amendments in ASU No. 2016-18 using a full retrospective approach. The Company believes that the adoption of this guidance will not have a significant impact on its consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business. The amended guidance clarifies the definition of a business with the objective of adding guidance to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. The new accounting guidance is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including

12


 

Table of Contents

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

interim periods within those periods. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact the adoption of ASU No. 2016-15 will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Compensation—Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting (“ASU 2016-09”). ASU 2016-09 simplifies several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and an option to recognize gross stock-based compensation expense with actual forfeitures as they occur, as well as certain classification on the statement of cash flows. For public entities, ASU 2016-09 is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company has adopted ASU 2016-09 during the quarter ended March 31, 2017. The Company has applied ASU 2016-09 using a modified retrospective approach and has adopted the option to recognize stock compensation expense with actual forfeitures recognized as they occur. The adoption of this standard had an immaterial impact to the Company’s financial statements. The adoption of ASU 2016-09 also requires all excess tax benefit on stock options to be recorded in the consolidated statements of operations. The adoption did not have a material impact since the expected increase in net deferred tax assets is fully offset by a corresponding increase in the deferred tax asset valuation allowance. The amount of deferred tax assets that had not been previously recognized due to the recognition of excess tax benefits upon adoption was $0.4 million.

 

 

3. Cash Equivalents and Marketable Securities

 

Cash equivalents are highly liquid investments that are readily convertible into cash with original maturities of three months or less when purchased. Marketable securities consist of securities with original maturities greater than 90 days when purchased. The Company classifies these marketable securities as available-for-sale and records them at fair value in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets. Unrealized gains or losses are included in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). Premiums or discounts from par value are amortized to investment income over the life of the underlying security.

Cash equivalents and marketable securities, available-for-sale, consisted of the following at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized

 

Unrealized

 

Fair

 

March 31, 2017

    

Amortized Cost

    

Gains

    

Losses

    

Value

 

Cash Equivalents:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Money market funds

 

$

31,001

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

31,001

 

   Government agency obligations

 

 

1,998

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

1,998

 

   Overnight repurchase agreements

 

 

15,000

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

15,000

 

Marketable Securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   U.S treasury obligations

 

 

22,508

 

 

 —

 

 

(13)

 

 

22,495

 

Total:

 

$

70,507

 

$

 —

 

$

(13)

 

$

70,494

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unrealized

 

Unrealized

 

Fair

 

December 31, 2016

    

Amortized Cost

    

Gains

    

Losses

    

Value

 

Cash Equivalents:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Money market funds

 

$

58,588

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

$

58,588

 

Marketable Securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   U.S treasury obligations

 

 

25,014

 

 

 —

 

 

(9)

 

 

25,005

 

Total:

 

$

83,602

 

$

 —

 

$

(9)

 

$

83,593

 

 

13


 

Table of Contents

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

Although available to be sold to meet operating needs or otherwise, securities are generally held through maturity. The cost of securities sold is determined based on the specific identification method for purposes of recording realized gains and losses. During the three months ended March 31, 2017, there were no realized gains or losses on sales of investments, and no investments were adjusted for other than temporary declines in fair value.

At March 31, 2017, the Company held nine securities that were in an unrealized loss position. The aggregate fair value of securities held by the Company in an unrealized loss position for less than 12 months as of March 31, 2017 was $22.5 million, and there were no securities held by the Company in an unrealized loss position for more than 12 months. The Company has the intent and ability to hold such securities until recovery. The Company determined that there was no material change in the credit risk of the above investments. As a result, the Company determined it did not hold any investments with an other-than temporary impairment as of March 31, 2017.

 

4. Fair Value Measurements

 

Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis are as follows (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

    

Active

    

Observable

    

Unobservable

 

 

 

 

 

 

Markets

 

Inputs

 

Inputs

 

Description

 

March 31, 2017

 

(Level 1)

 

(Level 2)

 

(Level 3)

 

Cash equivalents:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Money market funds

 

$

31,001

 

$

31,001

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

   Government agency obligations

 

 

1,998

 

 

1,998

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

   Overnight repurchase agreements

 

 

15,000

 

 

 —

 

 

15,000

 

 

 —

 

Marketable securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   U.S treasury obligations

 

 

22,495

 

 

22,495

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 

$

70,494

 

$

55,494

 

$

15,000

 

$

 —

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

    

Active

    

Observable

    

Unobservable

 

 

 

 

 

 

Markets

 

Inputs

 

Inputs

 

Description

 

December 31, 2016

 

(Level 1)

 

(Level 2)

 

(Level 3)

 

Cash equivalents:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Money market funds

 

$

58,588

 

$

58,588

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

Marketable securities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   U.S treasury obligations

 

 

25,005

 

 

25,005

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 

$

83,593

 

$

83,593

 

$

 —

 

$

 —

 

 

 

5. Restricted Cash

 

At March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the Company had $483,000 in restricted cash that serves as the security deposit on the lease of the Company’s current facility in Cambridge, Massachusetts (Note 8).

 

6. Accrued Expenses

 

Accrued expenses consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

March 31, 2017

    

December 31, 2016

 

Employee compensation and benefits

 

$

831

 

$

1,911

 

External research and preclinical development

 

 

2,482

 

 

3,290

 

Professional fees

 

 

631

 

 

819

 

Facilities

 

 

41

 

 

90

 

Restricted stock liability

 

 

 4

 

 

 5

 

 

 

$

3,989

 

$

6,115

 

 

14


 

Table of Contents

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

 

7. Indebtedness

 

Equipment Financing

 

In March 2015, the Company entered into a lease agreement with a vendor for certain laboratory equipment. The Company financed $389,000 of the amount owed under the lease agreement and is required to make consecutive monthly payments of principal, plus accrued interest at 6.44%, over 36 months through March 2018. During the three months ended March 31, 2017, the Company made payments of $43,000, of which $3,000 related to interest. At March 31, 2017,  $166,000 of principal was outstanding with respect to the equipment financing arrangement. The Company also leases some of its office equipment under a capital lease agreement.

 

8. Commitments and Contingencies

 

Operating Leases

 

In March 2015, the Company entered into an operating lease for approximately 21,488 rentable square feet of office and laboratory space in Cambridge, Massachusetts (the “2015 Lease”), with a lease term commencing in August 2015 and ending in October 2020. The Company has an option to extend the lease for five additional years. The Company’s lease agreement has escalating rent payments and the Company records rent expense on a straight-line basis over the term of the lease, including any rent-free periods. The Company recorded rent expense of $882,000 for the year ended December 31, 2016 and $221,000 and $220,000 for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively, related to the 2015 Lease. The lease agreement required the Company to issue an original letter of credit in the amount of $483,000, which is included in restricted cash in the accompanying balance sheet at December 31, 2016 and March 31, 2017.

 

The 2015 Lease includes certain lease incentives in the form of tenant allowances. The Company has capitalized the improvements made with the tenant allowance into fixed assets and established a liability for the deferred lease incentive upon occupancy. The Company recorded these incentives as a component of deferred rent and will amortize these incentives as a reduction of rent expense over the lease term. The related fixed assets will be amortized over the lease term.

 

License Agreements

 

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc. and Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research

 

        In February 2013, the Company entered into a license agreement with Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Inc. ("Dana-Farber") pursuant to which the Company was granted an exclusive worldwide, sublicensable license under specified patents relating to CDK7 inhibitors and JNK inhibitors owned or controlled by Dana-Farber. Payments totaling $3.4 million are due to Dana-Farber if and when the Company achieves certain clinical and regulatory milestones for any licensed product, none of which have been achieved as of March 31, 2017. No future potential milestone payments have been accrued as of March 31, 2017 or December 31, 2016, respectively, as no milestones have been achieved and the agreement can be cancelled at the Company's option. Therefore, the Company had no obligation to pay any of these amounts. The Company is obligated to pay a tiered royalty on net sales for licensed products in any country subject to the license. Royalty payments, if any, would continue for the duration of the licensed patents.

 

In April 2013, the Company entered into a license agreement with the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research ("Whitehead") and the Dana-Farber, pursuant to which the Company was granted a worldwide, sublicensable license under specified patents relating to modulators of Myc/Max Screen, relating to Chem-Seq owned or controlled by Whitehead and Dana-Farber.

 

In April 2013, the Company entered into an additional license agreement with Whitehead, pursuant to which the Company was granted a worldwide license under specified patents relating to super-enhancers owned or controlled by Whitehead.

15


 

Table of Contents

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

In connection with the Whitehead agreements, the Company issued 171,674 shares of its common stock to Whitehead in April 2013. Payments totaling $3.6 million are due under the Whitehead agreements when the Company achieves certain milestones. The future potential milestone payments due under the Whitehead agreements have not been accrued as of March 31, 2017 or December 31, 2016, respectively, as no milestones have been achieved and the agreement can be cancelled at the Company's option. Therefore, the Company had no obligation to pay any of these amounts. The Company paid Whitehead and the Whitehead Institute for Genome Technology Core $0.2 million and $0.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively, for annual license maintenance fees and research services.

 

TMRC Co. Ltd.

 

 In September 2015, the Company entered into an exclusive license agreement with the Japanese oncology company TMRC Co. Ltd., ("TMRC") to develop and commercialize tamibarotene in North America and Europe for the treatment of cancer. This agreement was amended and restated in April 2016.

In exchange for this license, the Company agreed to make a non-refundable upfront payment of $1.0 million, for which $0.5 million was paid in September 2015 upon execution of the agreement, and the remaining $0.5 million was paid in May 2016. Under the agreement, the Company is also obligated to make payments upon the successful achievement of clinical and regulatory milestones totaling approximately $13.0 million per indication, defined as a distinct tumor type. In September 2016, the Company paid $1.0 million to TMRC for a development milestone achieved upon the successful dosing of the first patient in its Phase 2 clinical trial of SY-1425. In addition, the Company is obligated to pay TMRC a single-digit percentage royalty, on a country-by-country and product-by-product basis, on net product sales of SY-1425 using know-how and patents licensed from TMRC in North America and Europe for a defined royalty term.     

The Company also entered into a supply management agreement with TMRC under which the Company agreed to pay TMRC a fee for each kilogram of SY-1425 active pharmaceutical ingredient that is produced. The Company made payments of $0.4 million under this supply management agreement during the three months ended March 31, 2017. No payments were made under this supply management agreement during the three months ended March 31, 2016.

 

9. Stock-Based Payments

 

2016 Stock Incentive Plan

 

The 2016 Stock Incentive Plan (the “2016 Plan”) was adopted by the board of directors on December 15, 2015 and approved by the stockholders on June 17, 2016, and became effective on July 6, 2016 upon the closing of the IPO. The 2016 Plan replaced the 2012 Equity Incentive Plan (the "2012 Plan"). Any options or awards outstanding under the 2012 Plan remained outstanding and effective. Under the 2016 Plan, the Company may grant incentive stock options, nonstatutory stock options, stock appreciation rights, restricted stock, restricted stock units and other stock-based awards. The Company initially reserved 3,218,742 shares of common stock for the issuance of awards under the 2016 Plan. The number of shares of the Company’s common stock reserved for issuance under the 2016 Plan will automatically increase on January 1 of each calendar year, commencing on January 1, 2017 and ending on December 31, 2025, in an amount equal to the least of (i) 1,600,000 shares of common stock, (ii) 4.0% of the outstanding shares of common stock as of such date, or (iii) such lesser amount as specified by the compensation committee of the board of directors. This number is subject to adjustment in the event of a stock split, stock dividend or other change in the Company’s capitalization. For the calendar year beginning January 1, 2017, the number of shares reserved for issuance under the 2016 Plan was increased by 935,430 shares. At March 31, 2017,  2,963,107 shares remained available for future issuance under the 2016 Plan. Under the 2016 Plan, stock options may not be granted at less than fair value on the date of grant.

 

Terms of stock option agreements, including vesting requirements, are determined by the board of directors, subject to the provisions of the 2016 Plan. Stock option awards granted by the Company generally vest over four years, with

16


 

Table of Contents

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

25% vesting on the first anniversary of the vesting commencement date and 75% vesting ratably, on a monthly basis, over the remaining three years. Such awards are exercisable from the date of grant for a period of ten years. The Company may grant performance-based stock option awards for which vesting accelerates upon the achievement of performance-based milestones. For certain of such awards, notwithstanding any vesting in accordance with the achievement of performance-based milestones, such awards may vest in full on the sixth anniversary of the vesting commencement date.

 

2016 Employee Stock Purchase Plan 

 

The 2016 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “2016 ESPP”) was adopted by the board of directors on December 15, 2015 and approved by the stockholders on June 17, 2016, and became effective on July 6, 2016 upon the closing of the IPO. The 2016 ESPP initially will provide participating employees with the opportunity to purchase up to an aggregate of 586,666 shares of the Company’s common stock. The number of shares of the Company’s common stock reserved for issuance under the 2016 ESPP will automatically increase on the first day of each fiscal year, commencing on January 1, 2017 and ending on December 31, 2025, in an amount equal to the least of (i) 1,173,333 shares of the Company’s common stock, (ii) 1.0% of the total number of shares of the Company’s common stock outstanding on the first day of the applicable year, and (iii) an amount determined by the Company’s board of directors. For the calendar year beginning January 1, 2017, the number of shares reserved for issuance under the 2016 ESPP was increased by 233,857 shares.

 

Stock Options

 

Performance-Based Stock Options

 

The Company has granted stock options to management for which vesting accelerates upon the achievement of performance-based criteria. Milestone events are specific to the Company’s corporate goals, including but not limited to certain preclinical and clinical development milestones and the Company’s ability to execute on its corporate development and financing strategies. Stock-based compensation expense associated with these performance-based stock options is recognized based on the accelerated attribution model. Management evaluates when the achievement of a performance-based milestone is probable based on the expected satisfaction of the performance conditions as of the reporting date. Notwithstanding any vesting in accordance with the achievement of performance-based milestones, such awards vest in full on the sixth anniversary of the vesting commencement date. During the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively, the Company did not record any additional stock-based compensation expense related to the achievement of performance-based milestones. As of March 31, 2017, there was $0.9 million of unrecognized stock-based compensation expense related to the performance-based stock options granted to management.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2016, the Company granted options to purchase 75,000 shares of common stock to an advisor for which the vesting accelerates upon the achievement of performance-based criteria. As of March 31, 2017, no such performance-based criteria were achieved.

 

17


 

Table of Contents

Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

A summary of the status of stock options as of December 31, 2016 and March 31, 2017 and changes during the three months ended March 31, 2017 is presented below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

 

 

    

 

    

Aggregate

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted

 

Remaining

 

Intrinsic

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

Contractual

 

Value

 

 

 

Shares

 

Exercise Price

 

Life (in years)

 

(in thousands)

 

Outstanding at December 31, 2016

 

2,543,435

 

$

6.44

 

8.3

 

$

14,898

 

Granted

 

864,000

 

 

10.91

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercised

 

(50,508)

 

 

2.78

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cancelled

 

(198,369)

 

 

5.17

 

 

 

 

 

 

Outstanding at March 31, 2017

 

3,158,558

 

$

7.81

 

8.2

 

$

25,554

 

Exercisable at March 31, 2017

 

908,893

 

$

3.74

 

6.0

 

$

11,082

 

Vested and expected to vest at March 31, 2017

 

3,158,558

 

$

7.81

 

8.2

 

$

25,554

 

 

The intrinsic value of options exercised during the three months ended March 31, 2017 was $0.5 million.

 

Restricted Common Stock

 

From time to time, upon approval by the Company’s board of directors, certain employees and advisors have been granted restricted shares of common stock with time- and performance-based vesting criteria. These shares of restricted stock are subject to repurchase rights. Accordingly, the Company has recorded the proceeds from the issuance of restricted stock as a liability in the condensed consolidated balance sheets included as a component of accrued expenses or other long term liabilities based on the scheduled vesting dates. The restricted stock liability is reclassified into stockholders’ equity as the restricted stock vests over time or upon the achievement of performance.

 

A summary of the status of unvested restricted common stock as of December 31, 2016 and changes during the three months ended March 31, 2017 is presented below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

Weighted

 

 

 

 

 

Average Grant

 

 

 

Shares

 

Date Fair Value

 

Unvested at December 31, 2016

 

4,885

 

$

0.98

 

Vested

 

(1,332)

 

 

0.98

 

Repurchased

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Unvested at March 31, 2017

 

3,553

 

$

0.98

 

 

 

Stock-based Compensation Expense

 

The fair value of each stock option granted was estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model based on the following weighted-average assumptions:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 

 

 

 

2017

    

2016

 

    

Weighted-average risk-free interest rate

2.07

%  

1.39

%

 

Expected dividend yield

 -

%  

 -

%

 

Expected option term

6.07

 

6.08

 

 

Volatility

86.14

%  

85.52

%

 

 

The weighted‑average grant date fair value per share of options granted in the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 was $7.96 and $6.13, respectively.

 

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Syros Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements (Continued)

(unaudited)

The following table summarizes the stock-based compensation expense for stock options and restricted common stock granted to employees and non-employees recorded in the Company’s statements of operations:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 

 

    

2017

    

2016

    

Research and development

    

$

330

    

$

560

 

General and administrative

 

 

554

 

 

102

 

Total stock-based compensation expense

 

$

884

 

$

662

 

 

As of March 31, 2017, there was $13.0 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock options granted to employees, excluding those option grants subject to the achievement of performance milestones, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 3.1 years. Additionally, as of March 31, 2017, there was $1.0 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to non-vested stock options granted to non-employees.

 

 

10. Subsequent Event

 

On April 26, 2017, the Company issued and sold an aggregate of 2,592,591 shares of its common stock in a private placement at a price per share of $13.50, resulting in aggregate gross proceeds of $35.0 million, before deducting placement agent fees of $2.1 million and other offering expenses estimated to be $0.2 million.

 

 

 

 

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Item 2.  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our unaudited financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and the audited financial information and the notes thereto included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 that we filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, on March 20, 2017.   

Our actual results and timing of certain events may differ materially from the results discussed, projected, anticipated, or indicated in any forward-looking statements. We caution you that forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate, may differ materially from the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report. In addition, even if our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate are consistent with the forward-looking statements contained in this Quarterly Report, they may not be predictive of results or developments in future periods.  

 

The following information and any forward-looking statements should be considered in light of factors discussed elsewhere in the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including those risks identified under Part II, Item 1A Risk Factors.

   

   We caution readers not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements made by us, which speak only as of the date they are made. We disclaim any obligation, except as specifically required by law and the rules of the SEC, to publicly update or revise any such statements to reflect any change in our expectations or in events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statements may be based, or that may affect the likelihood that actual results will differ from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

We are a biopharmaceutical company pioneering an understanding of the non-coding regulatory region of the genome controlling the activation and repression of genes. Our goal is to advance a new wave of medicines to control the expression of disease-driving genes. We have built a proprietary gene control platform designed to systematically and efficiently analyze this unexploited region of DNA in human disease tissue to identify and drug novel targets linked to genomically defined patient populations. Because gene expression is fundamental to the function of all cells, we believe that our gene control platform has broad potential to create medicines that achieve profound and durable benefit across therapeutic areas and a range of diseases. By focusing on genomically defined subsets of patients, we believe we can conduct efficient clinical trials with a higher likelihood of success. We are currently focused on developing treatments for cancer and immune-mediated diseases and are building a pipeline of gene control medicines.

In the third quarter of 2016, we began enrolling patients in a Phase 2 clinical trial for our lead product candidate, SY-1425 (tamibarotene), an oral, potent and selective retinoic acid receptor alpha, or RARα, agonist, in genomically defined subsets of patients with relapsed or refractory acute myelogenous leukemia, or AML, and relapsed high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, or MDS. In the fourth quarter of 2016, an investigational device exemption for the assay being used to select patients for this trial was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, or FDA. With this approval, we have expanded this trial to include newly diagnosed AML patients who are at least 60 years old and are not suitable candidates for standard chemotherapy, and lower-risk, transfusion-dependent MDS patients. During 2017, we further expanded this trial to explore the safety and efficacy of SY-1425 when combined with azacitidine, a hypomethylating agent that is commonly used to treat AML, in newly diagnosed AML patients who are at least 60 years old and not suitable candidates for standard chemotherapy. On the basis of preclinical data we have generated, we also plan to pursue clinical development of SY-1425 in combination with an anti-CD38 therapeutic antibody in defined subsets of AML and MDS patients identified using our biomarkers. In May 2017, we initiated a Phase 1 clinical trial for our development candidate SY-1365, a highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 7, or CDK7, in patients with advanced solid tumors. Both of these programs may have potential in additional disease indications. Using our platform, we are also generating a pipeline of novel preclinical drug candidates in cancer, including immuno-oncology, and advancing our research efforts in autoimmune and rare genetic diseases. We plan to advance one of our four preclinical programs to support a potential investigational new drug application, or IND, filing in 2019. Our goal is to build a fully integrated biopharmaceutical company based on our leadership position in gene control.

 

Since our inception in November 2011, we have devoted substantially all of our resources to organizing and staffing our company, business planning, raising capital, developing our technology platform and conducting preclinical research

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for our product candidates. We do not have any products approved for sale and have not generated any revenue from product sales. We have financed our operations to date primarily through private placements of preferred stock and the initial public offering of our common stock, or IPO. From inception through March 31, 2017, we raised an aggregate $179.7 million from such transactions, including $57.5 million in aggregate gross proceeds from our IPO in July 2016, and $122.2 million of gross proceeds from sales of our preferred stock and from the issuance of convertible notes that subsequently converted to preferred stock to fund operations. On April 26, 2017, we issued and sold an aggregate of 2,592,591 shares of our common stock in a private placement at a price per share of $13.50, resulting in aggregate gross proceeds of $35.0 million, before deducting placement agent fees of $2.1 million and other offering expenses estimated to be $0.2 million.

 

Since inception, we have incurred significant operating losses. Our net losses were $11.5 million and $10.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. As of March 31, 2017, we had an accumulated deficit of $112.8 million. We expect to continue to incur significant expenses and operating losses for the foreseeable future. We anticipate that our expenses will increase significantly in connection with our ongoing activities, as we:

 

·

continue the planned clinical development activities with respect to SY-1425, including a Phase 2 clinical trial for which enrollment began in the third quarter of 2016, and SY-1365, for which enrollment in a Phase 1 clinical trial began in the second quarter of 2017;

 

·

develop and seek approval of companion diagnostic tests for use in identifying patients who may benefit from treatment with our products and product candidates;

 

·

develop and scale up our manufacturing processes and capabilities to support our ongoing preclinical activities and clinical trials of our product candidates;

 

·

seek regulatory and marketing approvals for our product candidates that successfully complete clinical trials, if any;

 

·

continue our disease mapping efforts to understand the region of the genome controlling activation and repression of the genes implicated in specific diseases;

 

·

initiate and continue research, preclinical and clinical development efforts for other gene control programs;

 

·

continue investment in our proprietary gene control platform;

 

·

maintain, expand and protect our intellectual property portfolio;

 

·

hire and retain key personnel; and

 

·

expand our operational, financial and management systems and increase personnel, including personnel to support our clinical development and manufacturing efforts and our operations as a public company.

 

Because of the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with product development, we are unable to predict the timing or amount of increased expenses or when or if we will be able to achieve or maintain profitability. Even if we are able to generate product sales, we may not become profitable. If we fail to become profitable or are unable to sustain profitability on a continuing basis, then we may be unable to continue our operations at planned levels and be forced to reduce or terminate our operations.

 

Financial Operations Overview

 

Revenue

 

To date, we have not generated any revenue from product sales and do not expect to generate any revenue from product sales for the foreseeable future.

 

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Expenses

 

Research and Development Expenses

 

Research and development expenses consist primarily of costs incurred for our research activities, including development of our gene control platform and the development of product candidates, which include:

 

·

employee-related expenses including salaries and benefits;

 

·

stock-based compensation expense;

 

·

external costs of funding activities performed by third parties that conduct research and development on our behalf and of purchasing supplies used in designing, developing and manufacturing preclinical study and clinical trial materials;

 

·

consulting, licensing and professional fees related to research and development activities; and

 

·

facilities costs, depreciation and other expenses, which include direct and allocated expenses for rent and maintenance of facilities, insurance and other operating costs

 

Research and development costs are expensed as incurred. Nonrefundable advance payments made to vendors for goods or services that will be received in the future for use in research and development activities are deferred and capitalized, even when there is no alternative future use for the research and development, until related goods or services are provided.

 

The following summarizes our most advanced current research and development programs:

 

·

Our lead product candidate, SY-1425, is an oral, potent and selective RARα agonist. We began enrolling patients in a Phase 2 clinical trial in genomically defined subsets of patients with relapsed or refractory AML and relapsed high-risk MDS in the third quarter of 2016. In October 2016, an investigational device exemption for the assay being used to select patients for this trial was approved by the FDA. During 2017, we further expanded this trial to explore the safety and efficacy of SY-1425 when combined with azacitidine, a hypomethylating agent that is commonly used to treat AML, in newly diagnosed AML patients who are at least 60 years old and not suitable candidates for standard chemotherapy.

 

·

Our development candidate SY-1365 is a highly potent and selective small molecule inhibitor of CDK7. We initiated a Phase 1 clinical trial of SY-1365 in patients with advanced solid tumors in May 2017.

 

We typically use our employee, consultant and infrastructure resources across our research and development programs. We track outsourced development costs by product candidate or development program, but we do not allocate personnel costs, other internal costs or certain external consultant costs to specific product candidates or development programs.

 

The following table summarizes our external research and development expenses by program, as well as expenses not allocated to programs, for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

March 31, 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

 

 

 

 

 

SY-1425 external costs

 

$

1,801

 

$

1,397

 

SY-1365 and other CDK7 program external costs

 

 

1,641

 

 

1,980

 

Other research and platform programs external costs

 

 

2,141

 

 

1,701

 

Employee-related expenses, including stock-based compensation

 

 

2,931

 

 

2,578

 

Facilities and other expenses

 

 

1,114

 

 

609

 

Total research and development expenses

 

$

9,628

 

$

8,265

 

 

 

 

We expect our research and development expenses will increase for the foreseeable future as we seek to advance our programs. At this time, we cannot reasonably estimate or know the nature, timing and estimated costs of the efforts that

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will be necessary to complete the development of our product candidates. We are also unable to predict when, if ever, material net cash inflows will commence from sales of our product candidates. This is due to the numerous risks and uncertainties associated with developing such product candidates, including the uncertainty of:

 

·

successful completion of preclinical studies, including activities related to an IND and minimally efficacious dose studies in animals, where applicable and requested under the good laboratory practice, or GLP, requirements of the FDA;

 

·

approval of INDs for our product candidates to commence planned or future clinical trials;

 

·

successful enrollment in, and completion of, clinical trials;

 

·

successful data from our clinical programs that support an acceptable benefit-risk profile of our product candidates in the intended populations;

 

·

successful development, and subsequent clearance or approval, of companion diagnostic tests for use in identifying potential patients;

 

·

receipt of regulatory approvals from applicable regulatory authorities; 

 

·

establishment of arrangements with third-party manufacturers for clinical supply and commercial manufacturing and, where applicable, commercial manufacturing capabilities;

 

·

establishment and maintenance of patent and trade secret protection or regulatory exclusivity for our product candidates;

 

·

commercial launch of our product candidates, if and when approved, whether alone or in collaboration with others;

 

·

enforcement and defense of intellectual property rights and claims;

 

·

maintenance of a continued acceptable safety profile of the product candidates following approval; and

 

·

retention of key research and development personnel.

 

Any changes in the outcome of any of these variables with respect to the development of our product candidates in preclinical and clinical development could mean a significant change in the costs and timing associated with the development of these product candidates. For example, if the FDA or another regulatory authority were to delay our planned start of clinical trials or require us to conduct clinical trials or other testing beyond those that we currently expect or if we experience significant delays in enrollment in any of our planned clinical trials, we could be required to expend significant additional financial resources and time on the completion of clinical development of our product candidates.

 

General and Administrative Expenses

 

General and administrative expenses consist primarily of salaries and other related costs, including stock-based compensation, for personnel in executive, finance and administrative functions. Other significant costs include corporate facility costs not otherwise included in research and development expenses, legal fees related to patent and corporate matters, and fees for accounting and consulting services.

 

We anticipate that our general and administrative expenses will increase in the future as we increase our headcount to support our continued research activities and development of our product candidates. We also anticipate that we will incur increased accounting, audit, legal, regulatory, compliance and director and officer insurance costs, as well as investor and public relations expenses, associated with operating as a public company.

 

Other Income (Expense), Net

 

Other income (expense), net consists of interest income on our cash and cash equivalents, interest, dividends, amortization of premiums and discounts, realized gains and losses on sales of marketable securities and interest expense related to our equipment financing arrangement.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our management’s discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based on our financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or U.S. GAAP. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make judgments and estimates that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities in our financial statements. We base our estimates on historical experience, known trends and events and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our judgments and estimates in light of changes in circumstances, facts and experience. The effects of material revisions in estimates, if any, will be reflected in the financial statements prospectively from the date of the change in estimates.

 

We believe that our most critical accounting policies are those relating to revenue recognition, accrued research and development expenses and stock-based compensation, and there have been no significant changes to our accounting policies discussed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 that we filed with the SEC on March 20, 2017, other than the adoption of ASU 2016-09 discussed in the notes to the condensed consolidated financial statements as of March 31, 2017.

 

Results of Operations

 

Comparison of Three Months Ended March 31, 2017 and 2016

 

The following table summarizes our results of operations for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, together with the changes in those items in dollars (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

    

Dollar Change

    

% Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Statements of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

$

1,101

 

$

 —

 

$

1,101

 

 

100

%

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

 

9,628

 

 

8,265

 

 

1,363

 

 

16

%

General and administrative

 

 

3,086

 

 

2,371

 

 

715

 

 

30

%

Total operating expenses

 

 

12,714

 

 

10,636

 

 

2,078

 

 

20

%

Other income, net

 

 

98

 

 

48

 

 

50

 

 

104

%

Net loss

 

$

(11,515)

 

$

(10,588)

 

$

927

 

 

 9

%

 

Revenue

Under the research agreement we entered into with a multinational pharmaceutical company, we recognized revenue of $1.1 million during the three months ended on March 31, 2017. The research agreement expired on March 31, 2017 in accordance with its terms, and we do not expect to recognize revenue from this agreement in the future. We did not earn any revenue during the three months ended March 31, 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Research and Development Expense

 

Research and development expense increased by approximately $1.3 million, or 16%, from $8.3 million for the three months ended March 31, 2016 to $9.6 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017. The following table summarizes our research and development expenses for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, together with the changes to those items in dollars (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three Months Ended March 31, 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

2017

    

2016

    

Dollar Change

    

% Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

External research and development

 

$

5,244

 

$

4,486

 

$

758

 

17

%

Employee-related expenses, excluding stock-based compensation

 

 

2,601

 

 

2,018

 

 

583

 

29

%

Stock-based compensation

 

 

330

 

 

560

 

 

(230)

 

(41)

%

Consulting, licensing and professional fees

 

 

339

 

 

592

 

 

(253)

 

(43)

%

Facilities and other expenses

 

 

1,114

 

 

609

 

 

505

 

83

%

Total research and development expenses